We are required to publish information on how we spend Pupil Premium and Sports Premium money and the outcomes for our children.

Background

The Pupil Premium (PP) is allocated to children from disavantaged families who are eligible for Free School Meals (FSM), or who have been looked after for more than 6 months.  This includes pupils eligible for FSM at any point in the last 6 years.

Schools are free to spend the PP as they see fit.  However, we will be held accountable for how we have used the additional funding to support children from low-income families.  We are also required to publish online information about how we have used the PP.

The amount of the PP is £1300 per pupil per annum and is assessed based on the January census.

Our School: Basic Information

We have a below average percentage of children entitled to FSM at Cranmere compared to schools nationally.  14.3% of our children are currently entitled or have been entitled within the last 6 years (known as “Ever 6”) to FSM, compared to 26.6% nationally.

For the financial year beginning April 2014, we received £62400 as our Pupil Premium budget for supporting our most disadvantaged children. 

The percentage FSM children in each year group was as follows (July 2014 source RaiseOnline i.e. last academic year):

Year

1

2

3

4

5

6

Percentage

6.7

10.7

17.6

15.1

23.3

40.0

The numbers of FSM in each year group is as follows (Nov 2014 i.e this academic year)

Year

R

1

2

3

4

5

6

Number

10

4

3

8

9

8

8

 Total = 50

In recent years we have seen the number of PP children at Cranmere decrease as a percentage as the school expands. Therefore, PP children tend to be concentrated more in the older year groups. However, this year has seen that trend bucked as Reception has had a particularly higher than previous intake of PP pupils.

Our School: Performance according to RaiseOnline

KS2 – The Value Added score for FSM children was 99.4 (published Nov 2014) and this is slightly higher than non-FSM VA of 99.1. It is below the FSM national average of 99.7. The average point score for disadvantaged pupils was 24.3 in maths, reading and writing combined. This can be compared to the national average of 27.0 for FSM and 29.0 for Cranmere’s non-FSM. In maths 89% of PP children made expected progress, in reading it was 78% and writing 100%. These figures may look low but the exceptional nature of this year group should be taken into account. It was a small cohort of 25 children, of which a high proportion of FSM children had significant special needs. As a school we are proud of the achievements and progression these children made academically, physically, socially and emotionally. KS1 – In Yr 1 phonics one pupil out of 3 FSM passed the screening. It is hard to make a comparison to the national average with such a small statistical group. In Year 2 SATs PP children’s APS was 10.0 compared to 14.6 nationally. non-FSM also had an APS of 14.6. Percentages of FSM children achieving 2b+ is also disappointingly low. We are examining significant courses of action to address this with this cohort.

Our School: Performance according to Surrey data

Early Years attainment threshold - % of children who have reached a good level of development

FSM

Band

Number of children eligible for pupil premium in 2013 - 2014

Number attaining the threshold

Number attaining the threshold expressed as a %

FSM band average  attainment

Surrey attainment average for children eligible for pupil premium

FSM6/CLA National attainment average 2014

             

6

8

4

50.0

34.7

35%

n/a

Yr 1 Phonics  - % of children who have reached the expected level of phonics understanding

FSM

Band

Number of children eligible for pupil premium in 2012-2014

Number attaining the threshold

Number attaining the threshold expressed as a %

FSM band attainment average 

Surrey attainment average for children eligible for pupil premium

FSM6/CLA National attainment average 2014[1]

             

6

15

5

33.3

46.1

49%

63%

Key Stage 1 attainment threshold - % of children attaining Level 2B+ in reading, writing and maths

FSM

Band

Number of children eligible for pupil premium in 2012- 2014

Number attaining the threshold

Number attaining the threshold expressed as a %

FSM band attainment average 

Surrey attainment average for children eligible for pupil premium

FSM6/CLA National attainment average 2014

             

6

22

6

27.3

48.1

45.9%

n/a

Key Stage 2 attainment threshold - % of children attaining Level 4+ in reading, writing and maths

FSM

Band

Number of children eligible for pupil premium in  2012 - 2014

Number attaining the threshold

Number attaining the threshold expressed as a %

FSM band attainment average 

Surrey attainment average for disadvantaged children[2]

FSM6/CLA National attainment average 20141

             

6

26

16

61.5

60.7

61.8%

67%

This shows that many FSM children are not meeting national attainment expectations for their age group but that this is broadly in line with Surrey averages. (This data is more historical than the RaiseOnline data and is only focused on attainment not progress). As with the internal data you can see that the longer a child is at Cranmere (i.e. in the older year groups) the more the gap is closed.

Our School: Performance according to internal Target Tracker data

Internal data shows a generally positive picture. In Year 4,5 and 6 the bulk of PP children have made good or outstanding progress. Year 3 (last year’s Year 2) are the exception and several data exercises have highlighted this as the stand-out cohort needing intervention to improve achievement and progress. In KS1 the pictured is mixed and difficult to assess due to small numbers and therefore statistical significance. Year 1 PP children coming up from Reception are in a strong position with most of them working at expected in all areas. Year 2 is a more mixed picture and there are clear pockets where special needs overlaps with PP, but also disadvantaged children who are doing well. In Reception all we have to work from at this time is an on entry baseline. In a cohort which presents particularly challenging needs and an increase in numbers of disadvantaged children, PP seem to be entering at generally good level of development, with a few exceptions.

Our School: Summary of spending

Attached is a summary of how the school has, and will be, spending the Pupil Premium this year to address the needs of those children entitled to FSM

Summary of how the Pupil Premium of £62400 is to be spent:

Sept 2014 to July 2015

Activities

Further details

Estimated Cost

Intervention

One to one (or very small group) tuition on a weekly basis by trained staff in the core subjects and/or social skills. They include 1:1 in maths and/or literacy, Talking Partners, Early Literacy Support, Fischer Family Trust Wave 3, Numercon maths and First Class at Number.

£10700 (tutoring)

£55214* (SEN TA interventions)

School trips

Parents with children entitled to FSM can apply to pay less for trips, workshops etc where parents are asked to meet the cost.  A significant cost relates to residential trips.

£4745

Training and software

TAs have received training in 1st class @ number, ASD and ELSA

£3500

Home School Link Worker (HSLW)

The Home School Link Worker engages with several families and offers support to parents in how to support their children at home.

£6399

Classroom Support

Many of the Pupil Premium children who have a SEND overlap work in small table groups supported by a TA in class. This is the case in most lessons KS1 and during morning lessons in KS2.

£14520

Counselling

This is run by an external agency called Valley Trust. They work with children who need support due to their background in order that they are positive and engaged at school.

£3000

Booster

This is run in the spring term of Year 6. It is for children on the Level 3/4 and 4/5 borderline. Some Pupil Premium children fall within this.

£200

Total

 

£98278*

*it is important to note that there is some overlap with SEN funding for the SEN Teaching Assistant support cost which in turn effects the overall costing figure. There are some Pupil Premium children who also have statements and therefore the school receives significant amounts of money that in part pay for the SEN TA support. Funding like this is notional and there is no real way of calculating what proportion of the money is from PP funding and what is from SEN funding.

JB Dec 2014